Study on formaldehyde in e cigs

Over the past week there have been headline grabbing statements in press.   News on studies of formaldehyde in e cigs, begging for the attention of the public and smoker too.  Statements like “high levels of formaldehyde hidden in e-cigs” and  “researchers find cancer-causing agent in electronic cigarettes or vape pens”.  As the week passed it evolved into ” e-cigs are worse than normal cigarettes studies show”.

What is amazing amongst these Chinese whispers are the facts that remain still: smoking is within the top 5 killers in the UK and US and note that it is the tobacco, not the nicotine, that kills. Unfortunately vaping is linked to smoking because you mimic the actions and there is nicotine. But that is where the similarities end. The public are being brain washed into thinking that vaping is worse than smoking- there are no facts to prove this.  The press has recently sensationalized these studies on formaldehyde in e cigs but it’s worth remembering that their conclusions are misleading.  Furthermore it’s difficult to deny that vaping is a smarter and safer alternative to smoking tobacco.

The study conducted by the Portland State concluded that vaping at high voltage will cause formaldehyde releasing agents to develop. We dont believe this is typical of vaping.   There are few vapers who use high voltage hardware. Why? well it is like drinking burnt coffee, the taste is simply not the same. When you vape at high voltage the taste changes, in fact, it can be unbearable.

The press hasn’t been completely thorough.  What they have neglected to highlight is that vaping at normal voltage does not produce formaldehyde in e cigs.

There is no proof that e-cigs / vaping are worse for you than smoking.  This is a fact.  We at Matchless will continue enjoying our vaping sessions, while remaining sensible about the voltage levels we vape at

E-Cigarette Vapour as harmless as air

When taking up vaping, many people, including myself, ask if e-cigarettes are harmful – a sensible question to ask. After spending some time reading through articles, reports, opinions and advice from medical circles it became apparent that the most toxic element I would need to be concerned about in e-cigarettes was Nicotine and this was only toxic in large volumes, massively larger than the amount inhaled through e-cigarette vapour. Coming to the world of vaping as a smoker, it was clear that there were fewer health risks associated with vaping and that vaping instead of smoking would be extremely positive change in my lifestyle.

Despite the occasional ‘scare tactic’ article in the media about vaping, the prevailing wisdom in heath circles and in the general public is that vaping is by far a healthier alternative to smoking. To further add to the body of evidence which supports this claim, a recent study shows that e-cigarette vapour is almost as harmless as air, which even to the already convinced vapour, will come as a pleasant surprise.

The tobacco giant – British American Tobacco recently funded research which seems to suggest that e-cigarette vapour could be as safe as air. The study uses human lung cells and robotic smokers to investigate the health risks and effects of smoking cigarettes and e-cigarette vapour.

The research was a joined venture between British American Tobacco and MatTek Corporation, which produces models of human cells used in laboratory experiments. The experiment involved using a smoking robot designed to emulate the smoking / inhaling process of humans. The smoking robot was used to expose the model lung cells to cigarette smoke, e-cig vapour from two different brands and plain air.

When the cells were exposed to traditional cigarette smoke for six hours, the cells died – not a surprise. However, much more surprisingly, when the cells were exposed to an aggressive and continuous dose of e-cigarette vapour, the damage to the airway tissue was “similar to that of air”.

British American Tobacco plans to conduct further research and test a wider range and brand of e-cigarettes and e-liquids to further prove their findings.
The new findings have been welcomed by health professionals and those campaigning for healthier lifestyles. Health officials are being encouraged by such professionals to promote vaping to smokers in a bid to achieve a public health victory.

So, no doubt the debate on whether or not e-cigarette vapour is safe will continue, and despite the arguments, the science and research based argument continues to add to the ever growing body of evidence that e-cigarettes are not as harmful as some misleading opinions and thoughts on the subject suggest.

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Smoke e-cigarettes? The laws are changing…

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This year could ring in big changes for those of you who smoke e-cigarettes.

From May, laws will be standardised across the EU restricting how large their liquid containers can be and how much nicotine they can contain.

Restrictions on advertising will also come in.

Politicians have been grappling for ages about how to deal with e-cigarettes, and whether they could serve as a ‘gateway’ to smoking actual cigarettes.

Opponents say they are a helpful tool for people quitting smoking and should be promoted.

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In the UK, the new laws mean there will be tighter rules on what products you can buy but in other countries the laws will actually be loosened.

For example, they are currently banned in Belgium but from May will be permitted again.

Refill containers will have to be no larger than 10ml while cartridges will have a maximum size of 2ml.

The strongest permissible nicotine strength will be set at 20mg (similar to a strong cigarette).

If three or more EU countries decide e-cigarettes are harmful, they could potentially be banned outright.

Some new laws have already been passed in the UK, such as a ban on selling e-cigarettes or e-liquids to anyone under the age of 18 which came into force in October last year.

One in four e-cigs will be banned in Britain next year after being branded too strong in European Court ruling

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POSTED ON DECEMBER 24, 2015BY IN HEADLINE NEWS, INTERNATIONAL NEWSWITH 116 VIEWS

One in four e-cigs will be banned in Britain next year after being branded too strong in European Court ruling

  • Experts are concerned that e-cigs are gateway for teens to smoke tobacco

  • Under new EU directive e-cigs will have to carry a health warning on them

  • New rules, in May, could also see cigarettes only sold in packets of 20

  • Around 2.6 million adults in UK have used e-cigs in the past decade

By Ben Spencer – December 23, 2015

A quarter of e-cigarettes are set to be banned in Britain next year after Europe’s highest court paved the way for tough new regulations.

Juliane Kokott, advocate general to the European Court of Justice, warned that e-cigarettes may act as a ‘gateway’ for teenagers to go on to smoke tobacco.

Dr Kokott, the EU’s most senior legal officer, said regulation is needed because of ‘possible risks to human health’.

Her intervention will have huge implications for the debate currently raging between health experts in Britain, some of whom insist that e-cigarettes will save thousands of lives, and others who are concerned that they have not yet been proven to be safe.

Dr Kokott said an industry challenge against the new rules – which are due to be introduced in May as part of a new EU directive – should be dismissed.

Judges at the court will have the final say when they deliver a ruling in March.

If they take Dr Kokott’s advice, and dismiss industry objections, vaping devices will no longer be allowed to contain more than 20 mg of nicotine per ml of liquid.

Analysis by London Economics, a policy consultancy, suggests that 25 per cent of the gadgets currently on sale use liquid stronger than this threshold.

The EU Tobacco Products Directive will also mean adverts have to be much more strictly regulated so that teenagers are not targeted.

E-cigarettes will have to carry health warnings telling people they contain a ‘highly addictive substance’.

And the size of refills and of the ‘tanks’ on the gadgets will also be limited for the first time.

Dr Kokott also said that a separate challenge from big tobacco firms over plain packaging for cigarette boxes should be dismissed, paving the way for rules to be brought in from May.

If that change goes through, cigarette packets will only be sold in boxes of 20, the packets will only allowed to be brown or green, and will carry a health warning covering 65 per cent of the box.

E-cigarettes contain a liquid form of nicotine that is heated into vapour to be inhaled, avoiding the harm caused by tobacco smoke.

Industry figures yesterday warned that the new rules will mean vapers are ‘outlawed’ and may go back to smoking if they cannot get the strongest e-cigarettes – but health charities say it is right that emerging industry is properly regulated.

Health experts agree that the devices are much safer than smoking tobacco – but some are concerned about unresolved safety concerns.

The World Health Organisation has warned that they may be toxic to bystanders, many rail companies have banned people from vaping on trains or in stations, and the Welsh Government is planning to prohibit the practice in restaurants, pubs and offices from 2017.

Yet Public Health England claimed in a report earlier this year that vaping was ‘95 per cent safe’ – a claim that was widely criticised when it emerged that it originated with scientists in the pay of the e-cigarette industry.

Dr Kokott said in a written ‘opinion’ presented to the court yesterday: ‘It is not manifestly wrong or unreasonable to accept that e-cigarettes possibly cause risks to human health and that that product could — above all in the case of adolescents and young adults — develop into a gateway to nicotine addiction and, ultimately, traditional tobacco consumption.’

Around 2.6 million adults in Britain have used e-cigarettes in the decade or so that they have been on the market.

Public health experts are keen to promote the gadgets as a smoking-cessation tool.

But they are concerned that the devices are being advertised as a lifestyle accessory – in much the same way that tobacco was in the past.

Ian Gregory, who runs the 100K group of e-cigarette companies, threatened that vapers would feel ‘outlawed’ – and would vote to leave the EU in a bid to rid themselves of the regulation.

He said: ‘Britain’s vapers are determined to save the devices which they believe save their lives.

‘They will now start playing a game of Brexit Poker with the Commission – threatening to vote for Britain to leave the EU in the referendum unless the Commission insists on Britain having an opt-out.

‘There is little awareness yet among politicians as to just how damaging the EU Tobacco Products Directive could be for the e-cigarette industry.’

He claimed that the ban on stronger e-liquid would drive so many vapers back to smoking that it would cost 105,000 lives every year across Europe.

But Alison Cox, director of prevention at Cancer Research UK, said regulation is needed.

‘We believe e-cigarettes need light touch regulations which will help guarantee products are safe and effective, and prevent them being promoted to non-smokers and children,’ she said.

‘But the implementation of these regulations needs to be monitored to ensure that they don’t prevent smokers who want to use e-cigarettes from doing so. It’ s important that people who want to, are able to move away from tobacco cigarettes, which are responsible for one in four cancer deaths.’

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of health charity Action on Smoking and Health, added: ‘Growing numbers of governments around the world are banning the sale of electronic cigarettes.

‘The EU, by regulating them as consumer products, and allowing their sale and use, is recognising the value of these products as alternatives to smoking.’

Totally Wicked, the Blackburn-based e-cigarette company which headed the legal objection, last night played down the significance of the document.

Fraser Cropper, Totally Wicked’s managing director, said: ‘This is not a formal decision, nor a legal judgement on the questions we raised in our challenge.

‘It is a legal opinion prepared to assist the judges in making their decision and will be considered alongside the written and oral submissions. It is not binding.’

One in four e-cigs will be banned in Britain next year after being branded too strong in European Court ruling

The Secret Bribes of Big Tobacco – BBC News

Published on 30 Nov 2015

A BBC investigation has uncovered evidence of bribery at one of the UK’s biggest companies. Panorama found British American Tobacco (BAT) illegally paid politicians and civil servants in countries in East Africa. The payments were revealed when a whistleblower shared hundreds of secret documents. BAT told the BBC: “The truth is that we do not and will not tolerate corruption, no matter where it takes place.” The bribery was revealed by a former BAT employee, Paul Hopkins.

Panorama: The Secret Bribes of Big Tobacco, is on BBC One at 20:30 GMT on 30 November 2015