Study on formaldehyde in e cigs

Over the past week there have been headline grabbing statements in press.   News on studies of formaldehyde in e cigs, begging for the attention of the public and smoker too.  Statements like “high levels of formaldehyde hidden in e-cigs” and  “researchers find cancer-causing agent in electronic cigarettes or vape pens”.  As the week passed it evolved into ” e-cigs are worse than normal cigarettes studies show”.

What is amazing amongst these Chinese whispers are the facts that remain still: smoking is within the top 5 killers in the UK and US and note that it is the tobacco, not the nicotine, that kills. Unfortunately vaping is linked to smoking because you mimic the actions and there is nicotine. But that is where the similarities end. The public are being brain washed into thinking that vaping is worse than smoking- there are no facts to prove this.  The press has recently sensationalized these studies on formaldehyde in e cigs but it’s worth remembering that their conclusions are misleading.  Furthermore it’s difficult to deny that vaping is a smarter and safer alternative to smoking tobacco.

The study conducted by the Portland State concluded that vaping at high voltage will cause formaldehyde releasing agents to develop. We dont believe this is typical of vaping.   There are few vapers who use high voltage hardware. Why? well it is like drinking burnt coffee, the taste is simply not the same. When you vape at high voltage the taste changes, in fact, it can be unbearable.

The press hasn’t been completely thorough.  What they have neglected to highlight is that vaping at normal voltage does not produce formaldehyde in e cigs.

There is no proof that e-cigs / vaping are worse for you than smoking.  This is a fact.  We at Matchless will continue enjoying our vaping sessions, while remaining sensible about the voltage levels we vape at

All You Need to Know About the Vaper’s Tongue

Vaper’s tongue… it doesn’t sound too pleasant, does it? The good news is it’s not a medical condition. The bad news is, it still isn’t that pleasant to have.

So what exactly is it? Well, it’s basically a situation where you stop sensing the flavour in whatever e-liquid you are using. Let’s say you’ve bought a nice mint e-liquid to use. At first you can taste it fine, but after a while you realise you can’t actually taste anything at all. This is vaper’s tongue.

Except that isn’t actually an accurate name. The proper name for the experience is olfactory fatigue. As you may or may not know, olfactory relates to our sense of smell. This means it’s your nose that has the issue, not your tongue or mouth.

Is it dangerous?

No – just a bit frustrating. The effect can last for anything from a few days to several weeks. Even though there is nothing actually wrong with your tongue, your nose’s temporary inability to smell the particular flavour you like to vape with means you won’t be able to taste much either.

Who is most likely to get it?

New vapers are particularly prone to being affected in this way. Remember, you’re coming from smoking a certain number of cigarettes a day. Smoking reduces your ability to smell and taste things to the same degree non-smokers do. As such, it won’t be any surprise to find you might have trouble identifying the milder flavours used in some e-liquids.

You might also get it if you like a particular flavour of e-liquid and you never change to anything else. Your senses will get used to that same flavour time and time again, and you’ll suddenly realise you can’t taste it like you used to.

People taking various types of medication might also be affected. For example, drugs that treat depression, high blood pressure and thyroid problems can all contribute to vaper’s tongue.

Can you avoid it happening to you?

You may not be able to avoid it completely, but you can certainly reduce the odds of this affecting you.

For example, we mentioned that it can happen to people who vape the exact same flavour all the time. If this includes you, you might want to try experimenting with a few different flavours. Some people have one flavour for first thing in the morning, one for during the day and another one to enjoy after dinner. This is just an example of course, but you get the idea. As you switch from one flavour to another, you’re giving your taste buds and senses something different to experience.

You should also make the effort to drink more water. This is always a good idea for your general health anyway, but it helps to rinse out your mouth and you’ll avoid dehydration too. Surprisingly, it’s the latter that can lead to vaper’s tongue, since vaping can dehydrate the parts of your body that inhale the vapour. If you can avoid this, you can hopefully avoid vaper’s tongue as well.

Trying different flavours, drinking more water and even brushing your teeth twice a day (if you don’t already) is all going to help you. But if you are still experiencing problems, you should consider whether any medication you are taking could be having a side-effect you are not aware of.

Trying to avoid being ill is a good move to make too. You can’t always avoid it of course, but colds and illnesses can deaden your senses more than you might believe. Try and think back to the last time you had a cold. How many foods did you really enjoy eating? Chances are you lost your appetite completely – and not just because you didn’t much feel like eating anything. If you lose your senses of taste and smell because you’re feeling poorly, you won’t get any enjoyment out of your food.

If you do suffer from vaper’s tongue, don’t just try swapping flavours. Swap to something stronger than you would normally vape with, too. Many people recommend menthol to help things start moving along again. A stronger tobacco flavour or even cinnamon can also work. If you want to steer clear of tobacco flavours because you’ve left those behind, stick with menthol and cinnamon and see how you get on with those.

Persevere

Sometimes you might be afflicted with vaper’s tongue even when you have done everything possible to try and avoid it. If so, keep on repeating all the steps and suggestions given above. These should at least help keep the period of ‘suffering’ to a minimum, and get you back onto vaping you can taste and enjoy again in the near future. Most importantly of all, don’t give up and go back to cigarettes!

E-Cigarette Vapour as harmless as air

When taking up vaping, many people, including myself, ask if e-cigarettes are harmful – a sensible question to ask. After spending some time reading through articles, reports, opinions and advice from medical circles it became apparent that the most toxic element I would need to be concerned about in e-cigarettes was Nicotine and this was only toxic in large volumes, massively larger than the amount inhaled through e-cigarette vapour. Coming to the world of vaping as a smoker, it was clear that there were fewer health risks associated with vaping and that vaping instead of smoking would be extremely positive change in my lifestyle.

Despite the occasional ‘scare tactic’ article in the media about vaping, the prevailing wisdom in heath circles and in the general public is that vaping is by far a healthier alternative to smoking. To further add to the body of evidence which supports this claim, a recent study shows that e-cigarette vapour is almost as harmless as air, which even to the already convinced vapour, will come as a pleasant surprise.

The tobacco giant – British American Tobacco recently funded research which seems to suggest that e-cigarette vapour could be as safe as air. The study uses human lung cells and robotic smokers to investigate the health risks and effects of smoking cigarettes and e-cigarette vapour.

The research was a joined venture between British American Tobacco and MatTek Corporation, which produces models of human cells used in laboratory experiments. The experiment involved using a smoking robot designed to emulate the smoking / inhaling process of humans. The smoking robot was used to expose the model lung cells to cigarette smoke, e-cig vapour from two different brands and plain air.

When the cells were exposed to traditional cigarette smoke for six hours, the cells died – not a surprise. However, much more surprisingly, when the cells were exposed to an aggressive and continuous dose of e-cigarette vapour, the damage to the airway tissue was “similar to that of air”.

British American Tobacco plans to conduct further research and test a wider range and brand of e-cigarettes and e-liquids to further prove their findings.
The new findings have been welcomed by health professionals and those campaigning for healthier lifestyles. Health officials are being encouraged by such professionals to promote vaping to smokers in a bid to achieve a public health victory.

So, no doubt the debate on whether or not e-cigarette vapour is safe will continue, and despite the arguments, the science and research based argument continues to add to the ever growing body of evidence that e-cigarettes are not as harmful as some misleading opinions and thoughts on the subject suggest.

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DOT Issues New Flight Safety Rule for E-Cigarettes

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WASHINGTONIn its continuing effort to improve transportation safety, the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration today issued an interim final rule (IFR) to prohibit passengers and crewmembers from carrying battery-powered portable electronic smoking devices (e.g. e-cigarettes, e-cigs, e-cigars, e-pipes, personal vaporizers, electronic nicotine delivery systems) in checked baggage and prohibit passengers and crewmembers from charging the devices and/or batteries on board the aircraft.

“We know from recent incidents that e-cigarettes in checked bags can catch fire during transport,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “Fire hazards in flight are particularly dangerous.  Banning e-cigarettes from checked bags is a prudent safety measure.”

On January 22, 2015, the Federal Aviation Administration issued a Safety Alert for Operators recommending that air carriers require their passengers to carry e-cigarettes and related devices exclusively in the cabin of the aircraft.  Also, on June 9, 2015, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) published an addendum to the 2015-2016 ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air prohibiting the carriage of e-cigarettes in checked baggage and restricting the charging of these devices while on board the aircraft.

“The importance of the safety of the flying public provides good cause for our issuing an IFR,” said PHMSA Administrator Marie Therese Dominguez. “E-cigarettes in checked bags present a safety risk because they are capable of generating extreme heat, which could lead to a fire on board the aircraft.”

Passengers may continue to carry e-cigarettes for personal use in carry-on baggage or on their person but may not use them on flights.  The Department’s current regulatory ban on smoking of tobacco products on passenger flights includes the use of electronic cigarettes.  Nevertheless, to prevent passenger or crewmember confusion, the Department has proposed to amend its existing airline smoking rule to explicitly ban use of electronic cigarettes aboard aircraft.

The IFR does not prohibit a passenger from carrying other devices containing batteries for personal use (such as laptop computers, cell phones, cameras, etc.) in checked or carry-on baggage, nor does it restrict a passenger from transporting batteries for personal use in carry-on baggage.

An e-cigarette is a battery-powered device that simulates tobacco smoking by producing a heated vapor, which resembles smoke.

The IFR is effective seven days after publication in the Federal Register. For a copy of the IFR go to: http://phmsa.dot.gov/hazmat/regs/rulemaking/final.

For more information on FAA’s Safety Alert for Operators, go to: http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/safo/all_safos/media/2015/SAFO15003.pdf

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration develops and enforces regulations for the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound operation of the nation’s 2.6 million mile pipeline transportation system and the nearly 1 million daily shipments of hazardous materials by land, sea, and air. Please visit http://phmsa.dot.gov or https://twitter.com/PHMSA_DOT[external link] for more information.

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PHMSA 14-15

Monday, October 26, 2015

– See more at: https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/dot-issues-new-flight-safety-rule-e-cigarettes#sthash.8UX9w6Lk.4b5iIHkG.dpuf

https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/dot-issues-new-flight-safety-rule-e-cigarettes

We Don’t Need ‘Decades of Research’ to Know Vaping Is Safer Than Smoking

A chemical comparison shows e-cigarettes are far less hazardous than tobacco cigarettes.

If Holger did not mean to address the relative hazards of vaping and smoking, it is confusing, to say the least, that he opens the original article with this question: “Are e-cigarettes really any better than smoking a cigarette?” More to the point, an article about the potential health hazards of vaping that fails to talk about how those hazards compare to the well-established risks posed by smoking is irresponsible, especially since regular users of e-cigarettes consist mainly of current or former smokers.

For a smoker contemplating a switch to vaping, it is worse than unhelpful to say, as Holger does, that “e-cigarettes pose dangers to our health,” that they “carry their fair share of toxic chemicals,” or that they “have negative effects on lungs.” The relevant question is how the risks of vaping compare to the risks of smoking, and there is no question that they are much lower. By implying otherwise, e-cigarette alarmists may very well deter smokers from making a switch that could save their lives.

Holger claims to be agnostic on the question of whether vaping is safer than smoking, and he thinks this is a scientific position. It isn’t.

“Sullum is right that I had no intention of answering this question,” he says in his reply. “I don’t have the answer because the jury is still out. It could potentially take decades of research before we know the long-term effects of e-cigarettes compared to smoking.”

This seemingly cautious position is not only wrong but reckless. We already know, based on the fact that e-cigarettes do not burn tobacco or anything else, coupled with chemical analyses of the aerosol they produce, that they are much less dangerous than conventional cigarettes. According to what Public Health England (PHE) calls the “best estimate” of the difference in risk, vaping is about 95 percent safer than smoking.

Holger is unimpressed. “Even if e-cigarettes are ‘95% less harmful’ than cigarettes,” he says, “that doesn’t mean they are safe.” In a world where nothing is 100 percent safe, this mindless insistence on the complete elimination of risk is a menace to public health. An alternative to smoking that’s 95 percent safer is a huge opportunity that should be welcomed by anyone who wants to reduce tobacco-related harm.

Might the current estimate of the difference in risk be off by a few percentage points? Sure. That’s why it’s called an estimate. But such a correction would not affect the conclusion that smokers who switch to vaping dramatically reduce the health risks they face. That would still be true even if the estimate exaggerated the difference by a factor of two, although there is no reason to think it does. In fact, it’s possible that the actual risk reduction is higher than 95 percent. “Some flavourings and constituents in e-cigarettes may pose risks over the long term,” says Ann McNeill, co-author of the PHE report. “We consider the 5% residual risk to be a cautious estimate allowing for this uncertainty.”

It is true that we don’t know exactly what the long-term health effects of vaping are. Although propylene glycol and vegetable glyercin, the main components of e-cigarette “vapor,” are approved as safe food and drug ingredients, a widespread practice of inhaling aerosols containing these substances is relatively new. But contrary to what Holger implies, that does not mean we need “decades of research” to know whether smoking is more dangerous than vaping. Whatever the long-term effects of inhaling propylene glycol or glyercin, they cannot possibly compare to the long-term effects of inhaling the numerous toxins and carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Hence it is journalistic, medical, and public health malpractice to tell a smoker who is thinking about trying e-cigarettes that he should wait a few decades until the evidence is clearer.

New CDC Data Suggest E-Cigarettes Are Helping Smokers Quit

The same survey finds that never-smokers rarely become regular vapers.

People who welcome e-cigarettes as an alternative to the conventional kind hope they will help smokers quit, thereby dramatically reducing the health risks they face. People who fear e-cigarettes worry that vaping will encourage smoking among people who otherwise never would have tried tobacco by getting them hooked on nicotine. New survey data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide evidence that top officials at that agency are wrong to favor the latter view.

According to the 2014 National Health Interview Survey, 13 percent of American adults have tried an e-cigarette, including 48 percent of current smokers, 55 percent of “recent” quitters (defined as respondents who had last smoked less than a year before the survey), 9 percent of “long-term” quitters (defined as respondents who had last smoked a year or more before the survey), and just 3 percent of people who have never smoked. The same survey found that 4 percent of adults were current e-cigarettes users (meaning they vaped “every day” or “some days”), including 16 percent of current smokers, 22 percent of recent quitters, 2 percent of long-term quitters, and just 0.4 percent of never-smokers.

CDCCDC

In other words, never-smokers rarely become regular vapers, which suggests the CDC’s fears are misplaced, especially since there is no evidence that never-smokers who vape are therefore more likely to become smokers or that the rising popularity of e-cigarettes has given a boost to conventional cigarettes. To the contrary, vaping and smoking rates are moving in opposite directions. The CDC’s survey data suggest that’s more than a coincidence: Not only was vaping much more common among current and former smokers than among never-smokers, but current smokers who had tried to quit in the previous year were more likely to be vapers than those who had not.

CDCCDC

Specifically, 55 percent of smokers who had tried to quit in the previous year were ever-vapers, compared to 40 percent of smokers who had not tried to quit. The rates for current e-cigarette use were 20 percent and 12 percent, respectively. It looks like e-cigarettes may very well play an important role in moving away from the real thing.

[via Michael Siegel]

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