Endura T20

T20

 

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Endura T20 Vape profile

The Endura T20 – Next generation Flavor Chasing Vaporizer

It’s easy to vape great! Simply pop the protective top cap off and pop it on the bottom. Click the high quality power button three times to power on and the amazing PRISM T20 coils will create incredibly delicious clouds of flavors for you to savor & enjoy.

Vape the Endura T20 for a smoother, more open draw than the Endura T18 and the flavor focused PRISM T20 coils are designed and tested to wick high VG eliquids.

The Delrin cap is easy to twist open and fill and the 2ml Prism T20 tank is TPD compliant and registered.

The Endura T20 is charged via microUSB, has integrated high quality safety and charging protections and is available in 1500mAh and 1000mAh.

Powered by the Innokin A1 Chipset, the Endura T20 is small in size and big in performance!

Initially available in four beautiful and durable finishes (Black, Silver, Red and Blue) the Endura T20 is the ultimate, compact flavor chasing kit!

Incredible flavors at the touch of a button. Experience vaping bliss with the Innokin Endura T20.

The Innokin Endura T20. Flavor. Redefined.

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CoolFire Ultra

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CoolFire-ULTRA-1

CoolFire Ultra Vape profile

The CoolFire Ultra!  150Watts of pure power and unsurpassed precision that fits perfectly in your hand!

Powered by the ultra-fast AETHON chipset, the CF-Ultra is extremely precise and packs 150Watts of real output and advanced Temperature Control into a compact and durable vaporizer.

The CoolFire – Ultra and Innokin SCION High Wattage Tank and Coil System pair perfectly for massive and delicious clouds!

The CoolFire Ultra is extremely accurate and easy to use and & the Quick Calibration of SS, Ti and Ni200 Coils deliver extremely accurate Temperature control with complete dry hit prevention.

More power! With the big 4000mAh battery with 2amp Quick Charge and Innokin’s ‘Vape while charging technology’ you’ll never run out of power!

The smooth curved design and high quality ergonomic button click perfectly into your hand for an unbelievably great all day vape.

The CoolFire Ultra is tech you can trust with integrated Safety and charging protections against overheating, over-discharge and more!

Innokin vaporizers are world renowned for quality and reliability. Available in 4 beautiful and durable finishes.

INNOKIN MVP4 QC TC

Say hello to the MVP4 Box MOD by Innokin. Powered by an AETHON microchip, this mod supports both precision temperature control using SS316L, Ni200 and Ti coils. It also features a 2A micro USB quick charging, power bank function, dry hit prevention and high quality stainless steel 510 threading. The MVP4 works perfectly with a variety of tanks too.

Parameters
Size: 24 x 46 x 94mm
Temperature Range: 150-315°C/300-600 °F
Wattage Range: 6-100W
Battery: 4500mAh
Standby current: 200uA max
Maximum output Wattage: 100W
Maximum output Current: 35.5A
Maximum working Current: 30A
Maximum output Voltage: 7.5V
Atomizer Resistance: 0.1ohm (Minimum)
Temperature Control Mode: Ni (0.1-0.2ohm), Ti (0.1-0.5ohm), SS316L (0.2-1.0ohm) coils are recommended.

It comes with

  • 1 x MVP4 MOD – 4500mAh
  • 1 x Micro USB Cable
  • 1 x User Manual
  • 510 thread

FEATURES

Max 100W output power
Real 4500mAh built-in battery
TEMP control (SS/Ti/Ni200)
Total TC Dry hit prevention
Ultrafast 0.2s from click to vapor
Variable RampUp wattage preBoost
High quality SS 510 threading
2A Quick charge
Power bank function

100W Innokin MVP4 QC TC Box MOD - 4500mAh

 

Kroma Vape System profile

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The Innokin Kroma Vape System – 75Watts of Temperature Control Power in an Ultra-Compact 72mm design, fitted for maximum grip.

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The Innokin Kroma Vape System  – 75Watts of Temperature Control Power in an Ultra-Compact 72mm design, fitted for maximum grip.
The Innokin Kroma Vape System is powered by the smooth precision of 75Watt Aethon Temperature Control Chipset (SS316L, Ni200, Titanium) with dry hit prevention.
Durable inset Stainless Steel 510 threading reduces the height even further when using the Innokin SlipStream 2ml tank and the included adapter allows the use of all 510 atomizers.
The high quality bright OLED clearly displays all important information and the power and ‘+’ – ‘-‘ adjustment buttons raise or lower temperature or watts in .5 increments.
The Kroma is extremely compact, fast and powerful with an internal 2000mah battery with 2Amp MicroUSB Quick charge and Vape while charging technology.

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Dangers Of Vaping Centered On Bad Products

are ecigs bad for you

The news media loves to talk about the dangers of vaping, even the fictional dangers that don’t scientifically exist. This isn’t a surprise, or at least it shouldn’t be. We all know that the media has a much better time with their ratings if they are scaring people. Just imagine you see a teaser for the news. It has ominous music and the narrator says “ecigs are very trendy, but the dangers of vaping are real and we’ll tell you about them tonight on the 10 o’clock news.” Think people are going to tune in to find out?

Of course they are. That’s just how the media game works and it is something you pick up on quite quickly if you just pay a little attention. That’s how the “if it bleeds, it leads” phrase became so well known. When that average American does turn on his or her nightly news broadcast feature about electronic cigarettes, they will undoubtedly be flooded with a bunch of scary threats. Lots of rumor and assumptions will come up and very soon they will end up thinking that the dangers of vaping are terrible. At the least, they’ll think that the benefits are far outweighed by those dangers.

There will obviously be comparisons made the analogue cigarettes, but they’ll stress the similarities. They’ll tell you how you are still ingesting nicotine and they’ll paint it in a way that leads you to believe nicotine is bad for you. In fact, that isn’t really the truth at all. They may tell you that there are dangers of second hand vaping, just like second hand smoke. Once again, that isn’t the truth either and nobody has scientifically proven that it is. All of these claims about the dangers of vaping are made by connecting dots that don’t really connect. But there is one danger that we know exists, and that is the one you should really be focusing on.

 

Real Dangers Of Vaping Products Exploding

Dangers Of Vaping Bad Products


Batteries are at the heart of the dangers of vaping, but it isn’t as if you should stop vaping (or not start at all). While the dangers of second hand vaping is pretty much a myth, there is real solid proof of this phenomenon of ecig batteries exploding.

We won’t paint a pretty picture here, because the reality is that it is beginning to get out of hand. Just in last week we have seen numerous news reports of people being injured by exploding ecig batteries.

But the news of an explosion that injured a mother of two in England and the one that injured a teenager in Canada are related. Just like they are related to the man in New Hampshire who suffered burns due to an ecig exploding. All of these incidents have to do with the real dangers of vaping; buying bad products.

We don’t mean bad products because they are overpriced. Nor do we mean to say they just don’t taste good or don’t produce the amount of vapor you want. No, we mean bad products because they don’t go through proper quality control. While most electronic cigarettes are made at least partly in China, there is a mammoth difference between purchasing from a reputable brand and something on a non-branded site or simply from ebay. It may be cheaper, but it heightens the dangers of vaping exponentially.

It’s true that sometimes there are faulty products and that can happen in any industry. But there is also a reason we don’t see anything negative like this in the news about any of the top brands we recommend. These are companies that have a reputation to uphold and so they take all the necessary precautions, and even the precautions that aren’t necessary. Whether driven out of a concern for their consumers or a concern for their public image, you’ll be hard-pressed to see anyone working harder to make sure that the product you buy doesn’t fail in such a dramatic way as to explode or otherwise put you in danger.

The other thing that is going on is the serious concern regarding counterfeit ecigs. Fakes are everywhere. The dangers of vaping have been exacerbated by the sheer volume of clone ecigs on the market. You will find cloned ecigs and vaping products all over the internet and sometimes even in vape shops. How bad is the problem? Here are some numbers that will shock most of you.

There are a handful or world-class ecig manufacturers in China. Eight Aspire, Kangertech, Smok, Innokin, Joyetech and a few others are exceptional. They make some of the best vaping products in the world. They have strict quality control and use only the best materials. These companies are located in an industrial area of Shenzhen, China. Within that same are are 600 ecig factories. 600!

Most of those factories are producing terrible knockoffs at rock bottom prices. The fakes look just like the real thing. They are being sold online through a number of retail and wholesale websites. Even vape shop owners are being fooled by some of these products. This is a serious problem and results in a lot of bad press for the industry when one of these clone ecigs is the root cause of some well publicized ecig accident.

If you are interested in a Kanger, Aspire, Joyetch product, you need to buy from a reputable source that knows what they are doing. The vaping business is booming and pretenders and fakes are trying to cash in as are the brands that are just blatantly selling junk! With no regulation in place it is buyer beware.

The real culprit here is greed. The dangers of second hand vaping aren’t real, nor are all these other accusations that just stoke people’s fears. No, the dangers of vaping lie in cheap ecigs. That’s why the FDA should be worried about cheap ecigs instead of fruity ecig flavors. As a consumer, make sure that these harrowing stories in the news don’t put you off from making the switch to vapor. All you have to do is make sure you buy from the right sources and you’ll be well on your way to leaving traditional tobacco cigarettes behind you, as well as ridiculous claims about the dangers of vaping.

ARTIST COLLECTION E-LIQUIDS

 

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The Artist Collection is a refined palette of masterful flavors expressed through sophisticated devices. Graced with nuance and subtlety, this exclusive new line of liquids presented is crafted by five leading artists in the vape industry, partnered with NJOY in the fight against big tobacco. Premium artists equal premium quality. These top-of-the-line mist makers bring out the best in taste and sensation because they pursue vaping with passion. Now it’s time to pursue yours.

ARTIST COLLECTION PREMIUM E-LIQUIDS

Available in 0mg, 3mg, 6mg, 12mg, and 18mg.

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Samba Sun – 30mL

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Paramour – 30mL

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Hedon’s Bite – 30mL

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Sacrè Coeur – 30mL

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Dragonscape – 30mL

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AC Gift Box

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E-quitting

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A five-year, first-in-Canada study, led by McGill cardiologist Dr. Mark Eisenberg, is exploring whether vaping really is the magic ticket to finally breathing free and easy.

By James Martin

Although the holidays may seem like a distant memory, statistically speaking, most of us are still sticking with our New Year’s resolutions. (For now. Let’s not talk about how many of us last until July.) For many, that means quitting smoking — and they’re hoping that electronic cigarettes will help. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly half of all American smokers have tried e-cigarettes to help them kick the habit. But Dr. Mark Eisenberg wants to know: Is vaping really the magic ticket to breathing free and easy?

Dr. Eisenberg is passionate about getting people to butt out. He gives a lot of smoking cessation talks — just last month, he spoke at the Jewish General Hospital, where he is staff cardiologist — and has noticed that, invariably, reformed smokers come up to him afterward to sing the praises of e-cigarettes, those increasingly popular handheld battery-operated vaporizers that mimic conventional cigarettes.

“This is just a first step," says Dr. Mark Eisenberg of his five-year study." But the fact is that smoking is still the single most reversible cause of mortality in Canada — so it’s an important first step.”

“They say, ‘I smoked for decades and I’ve tried everything — nicotine gum, patches, Zyban, Champix — and I couldn’t stop. Then I picked up an e-cigarette and I never smoked again,’” recalls Eisenberg, who is also a professor in McGill’s Faculty of Medicine and director of the Joint MD/PhD program. “Anecdotally, we have many, many cases like this.”

What doctors don’t have, however, is hard data to back it up. That’s why, this month Eisenberg will start a five-year clinical trial to look at how effective e-cigarettes are at aiding smoking cessation. It’s not just smokers and physicians who are interested in such clarity — so are lawmakers. Under Canada’s Food and Drug Act, e-cigarettes containing nicotine cannot be imported, advertised or sold without Health Canada’s approval; nicotine-free e-cigarettes are not restricted. Although Health Canada has yet to grant such approval, nicotine-loaded e-cigarettes are nevertheless widely and openly available in Canada.

The study, which is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), will follow 486 outpatient smokers at 19 sites across Canada. The smokers will be randomized into three groups. One group will be given e-cigarettes that contain nicotine and counselling. The second group will receive e-cigarettes that do not contain nicotine, and counselling. The third group will only receive counselling. The researchers will supply the smokers with e-cigarettes for 12 weeks, and then follow up with them after six months and a year, observing whether they graduate to total non-smoking, continue with the e-cigarettes, or return to conventional cigarettes. Although some reformed smokers may fall off the wagon after a smoke-free year, Eisenberg clarifies that “statistically significant results at 12 months would still be important evidence” for the efficacy of e-cigarettes as a cessation aid. All 486 patients will not be enrolled simultaneously, with the study expected to roll out over the course of five years.

“The ultimate goal is to use the e-cigarette as a transitional tool in going from smoking conventional cigarettes to not smoking at all,” says Eisenberg. He notes that, at least in the early stages, e-cigarettes are about “transferring the addiction. You’re getting people onto something else that is giving them their nicotine, so they may never quit. E-cigarettes also provide other physical and social aspects because they feel like a cigarette; a pack-a-day smoker makes that hand-to-mouth motion more than 70,000 times a year, for example. That’s a difficult thing to break away from, and a nicotine patch doesn’t provide it.

“We have great hopes that e-cigarettes will be helpful for people trying to quit smoking,” he adds. “Even if they just switch to smoking e-cigarettes that would be better than continuing to smoke conventional cigarettes for decades. I’m not saying that e-cigarettes are safe, but they’re much safer than conventional cigarettes. They’re not going to give you lung cancer. They’re not going to give you heart disease. They’re not going to give you emphysema.

“But what we’re really hoping for is that e-cigarettes lead people to not smoking altogether.”

(This particular study, Eisenberg notes, is not designed to investigate safety concerns, such as whether e-cigarette vapour contains trace elements of harmful substances. Other than their smoking habits, the trial’s participants are healthy, he explains, “so the chances that they’d have adverse effects over a short time like the course of one year are quite low.” The researchers will, however, track whether the smokers are hospitalized for any cardiopulmonary issues. They will also gather data about benign side effects, such as throat irritation.)

E-cigarettes are already big business, ringing up an estimated $500-plus million in sales in the U.S. alone — and that’s without being able to make any claims about helping smokers kick their habits. Eisenberg says that the e-cigarette industry itself isn’t clamouring to make such claims: “They don’t want to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration [in the U.S.] and Health Canada, so they don’t want to support clinical trials,” he says. “And they don’t need to: Smokers are voting with their feet by buying e-cigarettes to help them quit smoking.” Governments, however, want more than anecdotal evidence.

“This study alone would not be enough for Health Canada to allow companies to market e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids,” explains Eisenberg. “That said, if this trial shows that there is a substantial reduction in smoking traditional cigarettes, then Health Canada will have to rethink their policy.

“This is just a first step. Then we would need multiple big trials in multiple populations. We would need to use tapering [of nicotine levels] studies, and we would need to use interventions that are longer than 12 weeks. But the fact is that smoking is still the single most reversible cause of mortality in Canada — so it’s an important first step.”

Posted on Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Do e-cigarettes make it harder to stop smoking?

File picture taken on May 25, 2009 in Beiijng shows the inventor of the electronic cigarette, Hon Lik

People trying to give up smoking often use e-cigarettes to help wean themselves off tobacco. Most experts think they are safer than cigarettes but a surprising paper was published recently – it suggests that people who use e-cigarettes are less successful at giving up smoking than those who don’t.

“E-cigarettes WON’T help you quit,” reported the Daily Mail. “Smokers using vapers are ‘28% less likely to ditch traditional cigarettes,'” read the paper’s headline.

The story was reported on many other websites around the world, including CBS: “Study: E-cigarettes don’t help smokers quit,” it said.

The study causing the fuss was written by researchers at the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, and published in one of the Lancet’s sister journals, Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

It is a meta-analysis, which means the authors reviewed the academic literature already available on the topic. They sifted out the weaker papers – ones that didn’t have control groups, for example – and were left with 20.

E-cigarettesImage copyrightiStock

The conclusion? Smokers who use e-cigarettes have a 28% lower chance of quitting than smokers who don’t use them, according to Prof Stanton Glantz, one of the authors.

But while the conclusion is surprising, so is the number of academics who have criticised the paper.

One was Ann McNeill, professor of tobacco addiction at Kings College London, whose own research is included in Glantz’s analysis.

“This review is not scientific,” she wrote on theScience Media Centre website.

“The information… about two studies that I co-authored is either inaccurate or misleading… I believe the findings should therefore be dismissed.

“I am concerned at the huge damage this publication may have – many more smokers may continue smoking and die if they take from this piece of work that all evidence suggests e-cigarettes do not help you quit smoking; that is not the case.”

Prof Peter Hajek, director of the Tobacco Dependence Research Unit at the Wolfson Institute also called the findings “grossly misleading”.

e-cigarettesImage copyrightiStock

The critics are making three main points. First, the definition of e-cigarettes is a bit loose. There are many different types – some look like cigarettes, others have tanks for the vaping liquid, some are disposable and other are multi-use. They all deliver different doses of nicotine. Many of the papers included in the analysis don’t specify which type people are using, according to Linda Bauld, professor of health policy at the University of Stirling.

Another point is that the studies vary in the way they measure how often people use e-cigarettes. “Some only assessed whether a person had ever tried an e-cigarette or if they had tried one recently, not whether they were using it regularly or frequently,” Bauld says.

Even the paper’s author admits it’s possible that in some of the studies e-cigarettes may only have been used once, which he says would not be a good predictor of whether they had affected people’s ability to stop smoking.

And there is another problem. You might expect, if you were going to draw conclusions about how useful e-cigarettes are in helping people quit, to focus on studies looking at people who are trying to give up.

Prof Robert West, who heads a team at University College London researching ways to help people stop smoking, says this analysis mashed together some very different studies – only some of which include people using e-cigarettes to help them quit.

Vape Lab employee uses an e-Cigarette while workingImage copyrightGetty Images

“To mix them in with studies where you’ve got people using an e-cigarette and are not particularly trying to stop smoking is mixing apples and oranges,” he says.

Some of the studies track smokers who use e-cigarettes for other reasons – perhaps because smoking a cigarette in a bar or an office is illegal and they want a nicotine hit.

“With the studies where people are using electronic cigarettes specifically in a quit attempt the evidence is consistent,” says West, referring to two randomised control trials.

Both are quite small and one was funded by the e-cigarette industry. They took two groups of smokers, and gave one real e-cigarettes, and the other a placebo. The studies reach a broadly similar conclusion to a large, real-world study called the Smoking Toolkit run by West.

West’s investigation follows people in their daily lives and assesses how successful various methods of giving up smoking are – this includes nicotine patches, medicines and going cold turkey.

These studies suggest that people using e-cigarettes to help them quit are 50% to 100% more successful than those who use no aids at all.

In his paper, Glantz acknowledges there are limitations to the research that he analysed. He agrees there are problems with the way the use of e-cigarettes is measured and accepts it’s not clear which devices people are using. But he is sticking by his analysis because he believes he has taken these factors into account.

The editor of Lancet Respiratory Medicine, Emma Grainger, defends the article too. She says she does not see a problem with the paper and that it has been through the normal peer-review process.